Equipment List

Mexican Volcanoes
Expeditions

CLIMBING EQUIPMENT

  • Ice axe with leash (A general mountaineering/glacier tool with a leash—70cm is a good length)
  • Climbing helmet (Adjustable fit to be worn with beanie and/or balaclava)
  • Alpine climbing harness (Adjustable leg loops and big enough to fit over all clothing)
  • Carabiners (One large locking carabiner and one non-locking carabiner)
  • Trekking poles (Collapsible poles; snow baskets required)

FOOTWEAR

  • Insulated, cold-weather mountaineering boots (Warm, crampon-compatible boots)
  • Crampons with anti-balling snow plates (Anti-balling snow plates required)
  • Gaiters (Expedition-grade gaiters—large enough to fit around bulky boots)
  • Heavyweight mountaineering socks – 2 pair (Wool or synthetic fiber only—no cotton)
  • Liner socks – 2 pair (Thin wool or nylon socks worn next to skin—no cotton)
  • Light hiking boots or trail approach shoes (For acclimatization hikes)
  • Lightweight hiking socks – 2 pair (Wool or synthetic fiber only—no cotton)

TECHNICAL CLOTHING

  • Nylon trekking pants or shorts (These are nice for the acclimatization hike—no cotton)
  • Short-sleeve t-shirt (CoolMax® polyester or similar—no cotton)
  • Underwear (Synthetic fabric only—no cotton)
  • Long underwear (lightweight tops and bottoms of wool or synthetic—no cotton)
  • Microfleece pullover or vest (100-weight fleece pile for layering/extra warmth)
  • Softshell or fleece jacket
  • Softshell or fleece climbing pants
  • Waterproof/breathable Gore-Tex® jacket (A roomy fit is important in order to fit over other clothing layers—hood should fit over helmet)
  • Waterproof/breathable Gore-Tex®pants (Full-length side zippers are required)
  • Insulated jacket with hood (Down or PrimaLoft®—light to medium weight; hood should fit over helmet)

HEADWEAR

  • Wool or fleece beanie (Beanie should cover ears)
  • Balaclava (Lightweight—balaclava and beanie should fit under helmet if worn together)
  • Sun hat with visor and neck protection (Synthetic with visor to shade eyes/nose)
  • Glacier glasses with side covers and neck leash (Lenses designed for mountain use—regular sunglasses are insufficient; a nose guard is helpful)
  • Ski goggles (Required in case of blowing snow/ice)

HANDWEAR

  • Shell mittens with removable insulation liners (Waterproof/breathable Gore-Tex® with removable insulation liners for fast drying; big enough to be used with liner gloves)
  • Lightweight fleece liner gloves (Worn inside of insulated shell mittens)
  • Insulated mountaineering gloves or mittens (Waterproof/breathable Gore-Tex®; required as back-ups)

PERSONAL EQUIPMENT

  • Technical daypack (Approximately 30-40 liters—keep it simple and light)
  • Headlamp (Bring spare batteries; lithium batteries withstand cold better)
  • Sleeping bag (Rated at least to 20°F)
  • Sleeping pad (Full-length; inflatable or closed-cell)
  • Nalgene® bottles – at least 2 (1-liter, wide-mouth bottles; no water bladders, as they will freeze)
  • Insulated water bottle parkas – at least 1 (To help prevent water from freezing)
  • Toilet paper (in plastic bag), wet wipes, and Purell® hand sanitizer (2-ounce size)
  • Personal first-aid kit & medications (Simple and light—to include Band-Aids, ibuprofen, ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin, Imodium®, etc.)
  • Lightweight personal toiletries, contact lenses, contact solution, etc.
  • Sunscreen and lip protection (SPF 30 or better)
  • Snacks for acclimatization hike and summit day (Please bring your own favorite high-calorie, high-carbohydrate snacks for these two hikes; all other food on the mountain is provided)
  • Camera (Lightweight—simple point-and-shoot)

TRAVEL GEAR

  • Large duffel bag with lock (For transporting all gear on airplane and to base camp)
  • Small duffel or suitcase for travel clothes
  • Travel clothes (Casual clothes for before and after the climb)
  • Walking or trekking shoes (For wearing in towns—lightweight and comfortable)
  • No cotton clothing on the mountain—cotton kills
  • Cotton can rob your body of heat if you get wet from weather or exertion/perspiration.
  • Choose synthetics which retain heat even when wet.

CLIMBING EQUIPMENT

  • Ice axe with leash (A general mountaineering/glacier tool with a leash—70cm is a good length)
  • Climbing helmet (Adjustable fit to be worn with beanie and/or balaclava)
  • Alpine climbing harness (Adjustable leg loops and big enough to fit over all clothing)
  • Carabiners (One large locking carabiner and one non-locking carabiner)
  • Trekking poles (Collapsible poles; snow baskets required)
  • Ascenders and/or Prussik ropes for crevasse rescue

FOOTWEAR

  • Light hiking boots (For acclimatization hikes—lightweight and waterproof)
  • Lightweight hiking socks – 2 pair (Wool or synthetic fiber only—no cotton)
  • Double plastic mountaineering boots (Plastic shells with inner boots)
  • Crampons with anti-balling snow plates (Anti-balling snow plates are required)
  • Gaiters (Expedition-grade gaiters—large enough to fit around bulky boots)
  • Heavyweight mountaineering socks – 3 pair (Wool or synthetic fiber only—no cotton)
  • Liner socks – 3 pair (Thin wool or nylon socks worn under heavyweight socks—no cotton)

TECHNICAL CLOTHING

  • Nylon trekking pants (These are nice for the acclimatization hike—no cotton)
  • Short-sleeve t-shirts – 2 (CoolMax® polyester or similar—no cotton)
  • Underwear – 3 pair (Synthetic fabric only—no cotton)
  • Midweight long underwear (Tops and bottoms of wool or synthetic—no cotton)
  • Microfleece pullover or vest (100-weight fleece pile for layering/extra warmth)
  • Softshell or fleece jacket
  • Softshell or fleece climbing pants
  • Waterproof/breathable Gore-Tex® parka (A roomy fit is important in order to fit over other clothing layers—hood should fit over helmet)
  • Waterproof/breathable Gore-Tex® pants (Full-length side zippers are required)
  • Insulated parka with insulated hood (Down or PrimaLoft®; hood should fit over helmet)

HEADWEAR

  • Wool or fleece beanie (Beanie should cover ears)
  • Balaclava (Midweight—balaclava and beanie should fit under helmet if worn together)
  • Sun hat with visor and neck protection (Synthetic with visor to shade eyes/nose)
  • Glacier glasses with side covers and neck leash (Lenses designed for mountain use—regular sunglasses are insufficient; a nose guard is helpful)
  • Ski goggles (Required in case of blowing snow/ice)
  • Buff or bandana (To shade neck and cover mouth; protects respiratory system/lungs in dusty conditions)

HANDWEAR

  • Softshell gloves (A medium-weight synthetic glove that has a light shell exterior)
  • Lightweight fleece liner gloves – 2 pairs (Worn alone or as layering inside mittens)
  • Shell mountaineering mittens with removable insulation liners (Waterproof/breathable Gore-Tex® with removable insulation liners for fast drying; big enough to be used with liner gloves)
  • Insulated mountaineering gloves or mittens (Waterproof/breathable Gore-Tex®; required as back-ups)

PERSONAL EQUIPMENT

  • Backpack (Approximately 50-55 liters—keep it simple and light)
  • Waterproof compression stuff sack for summit clothing (Insulated parka, etc.)
  • Nylon stuff/compression sacks (Several different sizes to organize and/or compress clothing/gear)
  • Headlamp (Bring spare batteries; lithium batteries withstand cold better)
  • Sleeping bag (A down bag rated at least to 0°F)
  • Self-inflating or closed cell sleeping pad (Full-length pad)
  • Nalgene® water bottles – 3 (32-oz. wide-mouth bottles; no water bladders, as they will freeze)
  • Insulated water bottle parkas – at least 1 (To help prevent water from freezing)
  • Eating gear (Insulated mug with lid, cup, spoon, fork, bowl with lid)
  • Toilet paper (in plastic bag), wet wipes, and Purell® hand sanitizer (2-ounce size)
  • Personal first-aid kit & medications (Simple and light—to include Band-Aids, ibuprofen, ciprofloxacin, amoxicillin, Imodium®, etc.)
  • Personal toiletries, contact lenses, contact solution, etc.
  • Pee bottle (Wide-mouth bottle with leak-proof lid—at least 1-liter capacity; mark it well!)
  • Sunscreen and lip protection (SPF 30 or better)
  • Earplugs (For noisy, windy nights)
  • Small repair kit (Duct tape, Gore-Tex® patches, Leatherman® tool, etc.)
  • Snacks for summit days (Please bring your own favorite high-calorie, high-carbohydrate snacks for the summit days; all other food on the mountains is provided)
  • Camera (Small point-and-shoot—keep it simple and light)

TRAVEL GEAR

  • Large duffel bag with lock (For transporting all gear on plane and to basecamps)
  • Small duffel for travel clothes
  • Travel clothes (Casual clothes for before and after the climb)
  • Swimsuit
  • Walking/running shoes and/or sport sandals (For wearing in towns—lightweight and comfortable)
  • No cotton clothing on the mountain—cotton kills!
  • Cotton can rob your body of heat if you get wet from weather or exertion/perspiration.
  • Choose synthetics which retain heat even when wet.